There are hosting providers that offer services ideal for a wide range of websites like ecommerce and personal sites that are packed with all the resources and features needed to build your own site online all with in one account, they provide domain names, drag and drop site builders, templates and themes and a large variety of plugins and components to help making your website a reality.
A fully qualified domain name (FQDN) is a domain name that is completely specified with all labels in the hierarchy of the DNS, having no parts omitted. Labels in the Domain Name System are case-insensitive, and may therefore be written in any desired capitalization method, but most commonly domain names are written in lowercase in technical contexts.[2]
Your next major concern will be compatibility. It's not a shock that most businesses run on Microsoft Windows and use some form of Microsoft Office. Being able to use common third-party clients such as Microsoft Outlook can often be a concern, and even today, compatibility with Microsoft Outlook isn't necessarily guaranteed. This is especially true when sending and receiving meeting invites. It only takes one garbled meeting invite to realize how frustrating this can be in the real world. Even if using Microsoft Outlook isn't a concern, portability is. If the service is entirely web-based, then is there a means for me to take my email offline and send email when I connect?
GoDaddy’s $1-hosting plans are an absolute steal in affordable email hosting. You may already know them as the world’s top domain name registrar, and they’re known throughout the industry for their domain, email, and shared hosting plans. With award-winning customer support, unlimited email accounts, and simple setup options, GoDaddy is the leader in cheap email hosting.
A fully qualified domain name (FQDN) is a domain name that is completely specified with all labels in the hierarchy of the DNS, having no parts omitted. Labels in the Domain Name System are case-insensitive, and may therefore be written in any desired capitalization method, but most commonly domain names are written in lowercase in technical contexts.[2] 
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