The cloud certainly makes delivering email to your users easier but, for the vast majority of organizations, there's still going to be some setup required beyond simply activating the service. At a minimum, a domain must be purchased and configured to point to the new email host. The service provider can make this process very simple or they can make quite hard; this is something you should watch for in the provider's customer support forums as well as in our reviews. In most cases, there is a validation phase that will require some technical familiarity, though a few providers go so far as to walk even neophyte users through it step by step. Other solid services bolster excellent support with tutorial articles and videos that also walk you through the process. The worst will leave you to figure it out on your own. 

Running in-house email servers does provide more control and wider customization as well as tracking and compliance for small to midsize businesses (SMB). But they require specialized on-site IT staff as well as the need to manually manage and support both hardware and software. A third-party hosted email service matches many of the advantages of in-house email without the expensive initial investment. The ability to manage the number of users, access the latest security protocols, and enjoy ease of connectivity and deployment of hosted solutions makes it a viable and competitive option.
G Suite’s Basic plan costs $6 per user, per month and gives users access to email via the Gmail browser tool, which includes email delegation, email recovery, spam protection, offline access, and attachment previews. G Suite also provides access to the business suite of Google Docs, works with third-party apps, includes 30GB of document storage and offers a guaranteed uptime of 99.9% with best-in-class security certifications.
Some domain name registries, often called network information centers (NIC), also function as registrars to end-users. The major generic top-level domain registries, such as for the com, net, org, info domains and others, use a registry-registrar model consisting of hundreds of domain name registrars (see lists at ICANN[21] or VeriSign).[22] In this method of management, the registry only manages the domain name database and the relationship with the registrars. The registrants (users of a domain name) are customers of the registrar, in some cases through additional layers of resellers.
A fictitious domain name is a domain name used in a work of fiction or popular culture to refer to a domain that does not actually exist, often with invalid or unofficial top-level domains such as ".web", a usage exactly analogous to the dummy 555 telephone number prefix used in film and other media. The canonical fictitious domain name is "example.com", specifically set aside by IANA in RFC 2606 for such use, along with the .example TLD.

G Suite is the parent group of Google’s email service, also known as Gmail. Starting at $6 per user, per month, G Suite features tools like email delegation designed around supporting business communication and collaboration. G Suite is the best email provider for businesses that need an email provider with easy access to great apps like Google Docs, Google Sheets, and Google Slides.
SpamExperts is the name of Bluehost’s spam management and advanced email administer tool. With it, email users can view a quarantined message, manage personal email settings, whitelists and blacklists and specify an incoming delivery queue as a way of reviewing and controlling incoming spam. The Plus plan is best for teams looking for email hosting services as well as a website hosting partner and more robust spam control.
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