They have shared hosting plans, reseller plans, and WordPress hosting plans. Their support is available 24/7/365 and very responsive. What we really liked about GreenGeeks is the default list of free features you get with every hosting plan. Everything from a free domain name, free SSL, free website migration, free CDN integration, to super fast SSD storage, and an impressive security system to keep everything running smooth! 

In case you still need to decide what would fit best for you, Bluehost’s support is ready to take care of you and guide you towards successfully launching your website. Moreover, with their help, you will get the most out of the package you will pick. Advisable would be to go with the cheapest option which would be more than enough for small and new pages.
StableHost provides Telephone Support, Online Live Chat, Knowledge Base, FAQs, and System Status Page, to get you the help you need. Their technical team is available 24/7. On the other hand, their sales and billing teams are available 7 days a week from 9am to 5pm (MST). When it comes to reviews, they garnered mixed sentiments. Some stated that their service was very poor. Although others were happy with their offers and their support team.

When it comes to resources, the company stated that they supply more than enough CPU and RAM to please the “average” web hosting customer. A high level of performance is seen by customers since they avoid overselling any single’s services. Free Cloudflare CDN, LiteSpeed or MariaDB servers, and other caching features are not advertised in their website.

BlueHost gives you a Knowledge Base, Video Tutorials, Live Chat, Ticket Submission, and Telephone Support. They are available 24/7. Reviews regarding BlueHost’ customer support service were mostly negative. It takes a long time for them to troubleshoot even simple problems. They are painfully slow when it comes to replying to questions and it seems like their customer support representatives are outsourced to other countries who speak English as a second language.
From hosting your personal website to actually building one, HostGator has you covered with everything. The quickest start out there. Meanwhile, if you already have a website and a domain name, they are happy to transfer both for you. Having it all in one place to operate and manage is very advantageous. If you might be scrolling up and down this collection and are not 100% sure which hosting company fits you perfectly, HostGator might be the way to go. It is an all-in-one solution for a prosperous web appearance.
SSDs are three times faster than the traditional HDDs (Hard Disk Drives) where data was stored in the past. Some website hosting providers still rely on those, putting their customer data at risk of getting lost, as HDDs are not just slower but also a lot less reliable. HostPapa doesn’t compromise on quality when it comes to our customers’ data and hosting experience.
Great article, Paul! Definitely one of the best reads on web hosting that I've seen. I was pleasantly surprised to see Hostinger taking the first spot. In my opinion, they fully deserve all the praise that they get. Your example with the customer support test proves that point perfectly. No hidden tricks, no downtime, no long support waits. I'm really glad I decided to give them a shot a while ago. Cheers.

This is one of our all-time favourite US-based hosting companies, they have powerful servers around the world (though none in Canada), and top-notch support. SiteGround is one of the fastest growing hosts around, and with good reason! Their focus on security, support, and ease of use is pretty impressive. They even developed in-house security systems to continually monitor and act on potential security issues.
But, again, operationally it's quite strong. 24/7/365 customer support is available not only by live chat and email, but by phone. It offers free site migrations with some dedicated attention paid to making a transfer as smooth as possible. And, if you're willing to go for one of the higher-end plans, the company has put some serious attention into performance and caching.
Yes, you can type “free website hosting” into a search engine of your choice, and you will get results. Don’t do it. At best, you will be stuck with shoddy service, semi-reliable uptime, and ridiculously short-lived storage and bandwidth capacities. The free options out there will frustrate you, and putting yourself through that makes zero sense when you can have quality hosting for as little as $2 a month.

A CDN is a massive network of servers all around the world that carry a cached version of your website, the main reason to have a CDN attached to your site is to maximise loading speeds no matter where the visitors are coming from. For example: If a visitor from France wants to browse the site, then the closest server or node to that location will serve the website, rather than the server in Canada doing all the work. Other benefits of having a CDN include protection against DDOS attacks and reducing your origin servers’ resource load.
Before we launch into our buying guide, you should know the three different categories on offer: shared web hosting (a good basic option if you're on a budget), VPS hosting (more flexible) and dedicated servers (for those running a bigger operation and in need of something more capable). If you're not sure which is the best level for you, you’ll find a detailed explanation of the different tiers at the bottom of this guide. It's also worth bearing in mind that you need to pick something that's going to be able to grow and scale up with you.
Support is provided in various ways such as through a Support Portal, Video Tutorials, Telephone, Live Chat, and Ticket Submission. All of these support options are available 24/7. Reviews regarding HostGator’s support system were mixed. A lot of people were pleased with their support staff. Although, some people were also pissed as representatives were stated to be incompetent with the company’s products and services.
This is the first in a series of blog posts about the Hosted Game First Year Demons, which was released on April 8, 2016. In this first post, I’ll talk about why and how IF can be used as a teaching tool, especially its combination of immersive first-person perspective and concrete dynamic feedback. In the second post, I’ll talk about the process of developing the story, particularly why we chose to set it in China, and how I approached the process of writing a game whose characters inhabit a culture that isn’t my own. In the third post, I’ll talk
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